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Sun or Shade?

Sun or Shade?

Quiet Quitting is a term that has recently taken over TikTok and has made national news. If you haven’t heard of it yet, let me give you a quick, non-biased synopsis:
 
Young woman in her early thirties, dressed in a stylish baby doll dress and knee-high boots goes into work one early morning. She places her newly purchased Rebecca Minkoff purse in the drawer of her desk, turns on her desktop, and starts her daily routine. By noon, her task list for the day was done. This is when the commencement of YouTube, text messaging, and “dm-ing” occurred.
 
When a manager of another division approached the young woman to ask for assistance, the young woman looked up at the manager and says, “I’m sorry, I can’t.”
 
This is quiet quitting:  young workers who don’t leave their jobs but reject the idea of going above and beyond. They say they do this to focus on life beyond the office.

Possibly, this new mindset is a result of the pandemic. I admit, the shutdown had so many positives. I felt free to explore life again. I found myself walking the neighborhood more often.  Sometimes I wandered alone, sometimes my husband joined me.  And the time with my kids was awesome. Not constantly driving from one meeting to the next was great. Wine at noon… well that became a problem.
 
However, since working my way up from administrative assistant to business owner, I have seen this attitude from employees for a long time.  Long before the pandemic, when I received my first promotion.  I was excited to finally have access to an administrative assistant myself who could help me organize my time and my tasks.  But to my surprise, that administrative assistant very often told me “I’m sorry, I can’t.”
 
“Holy shit,” I thought. I would have never, ever say that to my superior! (Which by the way, I hate that word “superior.”)
 
But the languid attitude happened repeatedly in many roles and positions. I see it more and more today, in both the young and old.  The drive to go “above and beyond” at work is becoming a rare sentiment. I even see it in business owners’ treatment of customers.
 
And now that we have TikTok, it’s a full-blown trend and deemed acceptable.
 
My opinion on this new trend? I do think employers need to be more conscientious and focus efforts to increase employee retention. They should treat employees with respect and appreciation. I also believe there is a portion of quiet quitting that is a response to employers overextending their workers and not acknowledging their loyalty. But I definitely disagree with the exploitive quiet quitting mentality.